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Serena Miller Ph.D.

Serena Miller

Director of Journalism Graduate Studies

Department
  • Journalism
serena@msu.edu

Bio

Serena Miller is an Associate Professor of Journalism Innovations, the Co-Director of Graduate Studies in Michigan State Universitys School of Journalism, and Associated Editor for Journalism Studies. Miller recently stepped down from chairing the Information & Media Ph.D. program for the School. The Association in Education in Journalism & Mass Communication elected her to the Standing Committee on Research to serve a three-year term. MSU faculty also elected her to serve on the University Committee on Faculty Tenure and the University Military Education Advisory committee. Miller received her Ph.D. from Michigan State University's Media and Information Program, her M.S. in Journalism from the University of Nebraska Lincoln, and her B.A. in Communication Studies & Theatre from South Dakota State University. Prior to joining MSU, she was an assistant professor at Arizona State University where she led the digital media and Ph.D. programs for several years and she also worked as an instructor at Bloomsburg University prior to attending her Ph.D. program. 

Before becoming a teacher-scholar, Miller served in the mechanic's platoon in the U.S. Army, raised crops and cattle on a 1,000-acre farm in South Dakota, and worked as a television journalist in the U.S. She is not only a traditional academic scholar but a creative one as well. She recently won 2 awards for her documentary and photographic work on documenting and preserving food cultures of Michigan-area Native American populations

Miller's ultimate goal is to bring out the best in her students to confidently grow as independent scholars and futurist thinkers through the undertaking of challenging projects and the exploring of their inner architecture. She recognizes that students need to connect to a higher-level inner calling in order to face challenging career pressures and personal life obstacles that they will eventually face in their futures. She envisions her job as a teacher is to help them discover their potential. To encourage problem-solving, critical thinking, and intellectual curiosity, her classes weave together technical applications, lab experiences, theory, and research.

In her courses, she seeks to inspire her students to be futurist thinkers in the profession and research by teaching them about cutting-edge technologies and underutilized approaches such as data scraping, website coding, transmedia storytelling (i.e., telling stories across social media platforms), community partnerships, social media analytics, YouTube channel web series, multimedia editing applications, interactive video documentaries, mobile journalism storytelling, oral history method, photo elicitation method (i.e., participants visually document their own realities), social media verification, scale development, and concept explication, for example.

Research and Teaching

Research                               
Media Sociology
Journalistic Practices

Social Media
Journalism and Graduate Education

Empirical Methods and Measurement
Scholarly Communities

Research Overview       
Millers earliest research focused on media sociology, news content characteristics, and emerging media, especially issues such as news quality, “citizen journalism,” and journalism education. Her quantitative and qualitative approaches addressed fundamental questions such as who should be classified as a journalist and what should be categorized as news because the identification of these characteristics is critical in understanding journalistsrole in supporting an informed society

She sees her role as an educator of both the MSU community and broader academic community. Today, due to her role in the Information & Media Ph.D. program, her interests have evolved toward investigating large social scientific research problems by targeting concepts that need conceptual and empirical specification. She believes that journalism scholars can encourage unity within the field by identifying and exploring theoretical concepts that represent the discipline’s identity. Example constructs that she has created or advanced include journalistic interviewing competencies, journalism degree motivations, citizen journalists, journalistic expertise, frequent news comment contributors, news content diversity, dialogic communication, journalistic role enactments, news source affiliation diversity, social media communicator roles, journalistic self-categorization, visual self-presentation, and journalism major mediated influences. She focuses on this type of work because variations in definitions and measures across disciplines limit the ability of researchers to predict and explain phenomena

Credentials

Ph.D., Media & Information Studies, Michigan State University (2007)
M.A., Journalism, University of Nebraska-Lincoln (2003)
B.A., Communication, South Dakota State University (1993)

Recent Publications

Carpenter, S. (2018). Ten decision steps in scale development: A guide for researchers. Communication Methods and Measures, 12(1), 25-44.

Boehmer, J., Carpenter, S., & Fico, F. (2018). Filling the void: Non-profit news and factors affecting government conflict coverage. Digital Journalism, 6(3), 369-388.

Carpenter, S., Hoag, A., & Grant, A. E. (2018). An examination of print and broadcast individuals’ personality traits. Journalism and Mass Communication Educator, 73(2), 147-166. (Journal acceptance rate: 25%).

Boehmer, J., Carpenter, S., & Fico, F. (2017). More of the same? Influences on source use in for-profit and nonprofit news organizational content. Journalism Studies. Published OnlineFirst September 18, 2017.

Carpenter, S., Peng, Z., & Cepak, A. (2017). An exploration of the complexity of journalistic interviewing competencies. Journalism Studies, 1-21. Published OnlineFirst June 23, 2017.

Boehmer, J., Carpenter, S., & Fico, F. (2017). Filling the void: Non-profit news and factors affecting government conflict coverage. Digital Journalism, 1-20. Published OnlineFirst March 21, 2017.

Carpenter, S., Hoag, A., & Grant, A. E. (2017). An examination of print and broadcast individuals’ personality traits. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 1-20. Published OnlineFirst January 21, 2017. 

Carpenter, S., & Kanver, D. (2017). Journalistic expertise: A communicative approach. Communication and the Public, 2(3), 197–209.

Carpenter, S., Kanver, D., & Timmons, R. (2016). It’s about me: A study of journalists’ self-presentations of their visual and verbal selves. Journalism Practice, 1-21. Published OnlineFirst Nov. 22, 2016. 

Carpenter, S., & Lertpratchya, A. (2016). A qualitative and quantitative study of professional social media communicators: An extension of role theory to digital media workers. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 60(3), 448-464. 

Carpenter, S., Boehmer, J., & Fico, F. (2016). The measurement of journalistic role enactments: A study of organizational constraints and support in for-profit and nonprofit journalism. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 93(3), 587-608.

Carpenter, S., & Lertpratchya, A. (2016). Social media communicator roles: A scale. Social Media + Society, January-March, 1-11.

Carpenter, S., Grant, A.E., & Hoag, A. (2016). Journalism Degree Motivations (JDM): The development of a scale. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 71(1), 5-27. 

Carpenter, S., Takahashi, B., Lertpratchya, A., & Cunningham, C. (2016). Greening the campus: A theoretical extension of the dialogic communication approach. International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 17(4), 520-539. 

Carpenter, S., Takahashi, B., Cunningham, C., & Lertpratchya, A. (2016). Higher education and public communication campaigns: The roles of social media in promoting sustainability. International Journal of Communication, 10, 4863-488

Lertpratchya, A., & Carpenter, S. (2015). Social media communicators’ motivations for professional engagement: A study of altruism, reciprocity, and reputation. PRism, 12(2).

Carpenter, S., Nah, S., & Chung, D. (2015). A study of U.S. online community journalists and their organizational characteristics and story generation routines. Journalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism, 16(4), 505-520. 

Carpenter, S., Makhadmeh, N., & Thornton, L.J. (2015). Mentorship on the doctoral level: An examination of communication mentors’ traits and functions. Communication Education, 64(3), 366-384.  

Carpenter, S., Hoag, A., Grant, A.E., & Bowe, B. (2015). An examination of how academic advancement of U.S. journalism students relates to their degree motivations, values, and technology use. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 70(1), 58-74.

Blom, R., Carpenter, S., Bowe, B., & Lange, R. (2014). Frequent contributors in U.S. newspaper comment forums: An examination of their civility and informational value. American Behavioral Scientist, 58(10), 1314-1328. 

Courses Taught at MSU

Undergraduate
Online Spartan Newsroom, JRN 400
Images and Messages, JRN 445
Broadcast News II, JRN 403
Public Relations Topics in Journalism, JRN 402
Advanced Multimedia Storytelling, JRN 492

Masters
Multimedia Reporting I and II, JRN800 and JRN801
Introduction to Quantitative Research, COM 803
Social Media News & Information, JRN821
Applied Research Methods in Journalism, JRN 816

PhD
Media Theory, JRN921
Media & Information Theory Building, ADV900
Scale Development and Reporting, CAS892

Project Title and Source

PI, Broadcast Education Association (BEA) (2016-2018). “Defining creative scholarship in communication: An interview study.”

PI, Council of Communication Associations (2016-2018). Defining creative scholarship in communication: A content analysis.

PI, Knight Center for Environmental Journalism (2016). The crafting of ricing moccasins. 

PI, The Arthur W. Page Center (2015). Visual best practices in communicating sustainability: A cognitive science approach.

Newspaper and Online Division (Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication) (2015). A qualitative and quantitative study examining the state of journalistic interviewing.

The Office of Sustainability. (2014). The sustainability practices of U.S. universities.

The Arthur W. Page Center (2013). Roles of professional social media communicators: An examination of perceptions, conflict and identity.

National Academic Advising Association (2012). “Cultivation and expectancy value influences on college major choice: A study of communication undergraduates.”

Favorite Quotation

“Some people follow the path laid out by others, and if they do, they will not have passion.” – Wayne Dyer

Descriptions

Describe in one sentence what you hope your students learn from you, your scholarly work or teaching:
To be inspired to challenge our understanding of the world.

Describe yourself in five words or less: 
passionate, focused, open, adventurous, honest

Contact Information

404 Wilson Road
Room 344 (third floor)
Communication Arts and Sciences Building
Michigan State University
East Lansing MI 48824

Twitter: @dr_serena
Google Scholar 

Howard Bossen Ph.D.

Howard Bossen

Professor

Department
  • Journalism
bossen@msu.edu
(517) 353-4613

Bio

Howard Bossen is Professor of Photography and Visual Communication in the School of Journalism and Adjunct Curator of Photography at the MSU Museum — the science and culture museum at Michigan State University.

He is the author of many articles and books, including Luke Swank: Modernist Photographer and Henry Holmes Smith: Man of Light. He was, along with John P. Beck, co-editor of Detroit Resurgent, which features photographs by Gilles Perrin and interviews by Nicole Ewenczyk. He co-edited with Eric Freedman One Community, One Week, Many Faiths: The Diversity of Worship and Belief, a book of essays and photographs by students that grew out of special topics courses in 2013.

His most recent curatorial project, Seeing China: Photographic Views and Viewpoints, co-curated with Shirley Wajda, was at the MSU Museum from January through August 2015. Other curatorial projects for the MSU Museum include Eighteen, an exhibition by Israeli photographer Natan Dvir; An Extraordinary Document of Our World with photographs by Perrin; Detroit Resurgent with photographs by Perrin and interviews by Ewenczyk; On Death and Horses and Other People, an exploration of Czech Carnival by photographer Marketa Luskacova; and The Radiation Mask Series, a photographic installation piece by Swedish photographer Magnus Westerborn. He was the curator for Luke Swank: Modernist Photographer at the Carnegie Museum of Art (CMA), Pittsburgh, Pa., and the Kresge Art Museum.

He is currently working on Molten Light: Photography, Steel and the Modern World, a book and an exhibition being developed for the beginning of 2018 with The Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg, Pa., and the Musée de la Photographie de la Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles Charleroi, Belgium.

He was a Fulbright scholar in Mexico and a distinguished visiting professor in the Center for the Arts in Society at Carnegie Mellon University. He has been an invited juror and portfolio reviewer to FotoFest, Photolucida and Critical Mass.

He founded the MSU Photo Communication in Europe study abroad program in 1983 and has co-lead it with Darcy Greene since then. He has a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University and has been on the faculty at MSU since 1979.

Contact Information

404 Wilson Road, Room 357
Communication Arts and Sciences Building
Michigan State University
East Lansing MI 48824

Maryam Naghibolhosseini

Maryam Naghibolhosseini

Assistant Professor

Department
  • Communicative Sciences & Disorders
naghib@msu.edu
(517) 884-2256

Bio

Dr. Naghibolhosseini is an Assistant Professor in the department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders and the director of the Analysis of Voice and Hearing Laboratory (AVAH Lab). The research in AVAH lab is focused on studying the voice production mechanisms and human auditory system. 

Dr. Naghibolhosseini is applying advanced image processing, data mining and statistical analysis techniques to investigate the vocal function and its underlying mechanisms in norm and disorder. She also employs computational mathematics to perform biomechanical modeling of the voice production and the human auditory system. She aims to develop new methodologies for voice assessment using laryngeal imaging.

Dr. Naghibolhosseini received her BS and MS in Biomedical and Electrical Engineering. She obtained her PhD from the Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences at Graduate Center of the City University of New York. She completed her Post-doctoral studies in the Voice and Speech Lab under the direction of Dr. Deliyski.

Dr. Naghibolhosseini was the recipient of the 2017 Sataloff Young Investigator Award, co-sponsored by Elsevier and The Voice Foundation. She also received the Provost’s Innovation Grant, Excellence in Teaching, and Excellence in Dissertation Writing awards during her PhD at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

 

Research and Teaching

Laryngeal Imaging, Voice Science, and Clinical Voice Assessment

Voice Biomechanics, Speech Perception, and Mathematical Modeling

Image Processing, Machine Learning, and Data Mining

News
  • The research paper titled "A Method for Analysis of the Vocal Fold Vibrations in Connected Speech Using Laryngeal Imaging" is presented at The 10th International Workshop on Models and Analysis of Vocal Emissions for Biomedical Applications; MAVEBA 2017 (Authors: M Naghibolhosseini, DD Deliyski, SRC Zacharias, A de Alarcon, RF Orlikoff).
  • A research paper titled "Vocal Fold Segmentation in High-Speed Videoendoscopy of Connected Speech based on Active Contour Modeling" is presented at The 12th International Conference on Advances in Quantitative Laryngology, Voice and Speech Research; AQL 2017 (Authors: M Naghibolhosseini, DD Deliyski, SRC Zacharias, A de Alarcon, RF Orlikoff).
  • Dr. Naghibolhosseini is awarded The 2017 Sataloff Award for Young Investigators! https://comartsci.msu.edu/about/newsroom/events/comartsci-researcher-wins-sataloff-award-young-investigators
 
Recent Publications
  • Naghibolhosseini, M. & Long, G. R. (2017). Fractional-Order Modeling and Simulation of Human Ear. International Journal of Computer Mathematics GCOM, dot:10.1080/00207160.2017.1404038
  • Naghibolhosseini, M., Deliyski, D. D., Zacharias, S. R. C., de Alarcon, A., & Orlikoff, R. F. (2017). Temporal Segmentation for Laryngeal High-Speed Videoendoscopy in Connected Speech, Journal of Voice, doi:10.1016/j.jvoice.2017.05.014
Contact Information

1026 Red Cedar Rd, Room 207
Oyer Building
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824

 

J. Scott Yaruss

J. Scott Yaruss

Professor

Department
  • Communicative Sciences & Disorders
jsy@msu.edu
517-353-8780

Bio

J. Scott Yaruss comes to MSU with an overarching goal to help speech-language pathologists improve their ability to provide meaningful and lasting support for people who live with stuttering.

The professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders brings nearly 20 years of experience from the Stuttering Center of Western Pennsylvania, as well as extensive connections within the research and support communities for people with fluency disorders. While at the center, Yaruss built and directed a strong clinical program that combined research, education, service and support for people who stutter, their families, and clinicians.

Yaruss holds a bachelor’s degree in linguistics and psychology from the University of California Berkeley, and a master’s and doctorate in speech-language pathology from Syracuse University. He has been an assistant professor and director of Stuttering Programs at Northwestern University, and most recently, an associate professor and director of the Master’s Degree Programs in Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Pittsburgh. He has also worked as the Coordinator of Clinical Research for Speech-Language Pathology at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh.

Yaruss has served in various posts for the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s Special Interest Group for Fluency Disorders and on the Board of Directors of the National Stuttering Association. He has maintained a private practice since 1993 and has been active in the stuttering self-help community for nearly 20 years. In 2011, he co-founded Stuttering Therapy Resources-a specialty publishing company focused on providing practical materials for helping speech-language pathologists help those who stutter.

Yaruss plans to relocate from the Pittsburgh suburbs to greater Lansing with his wife, Virginia, in early 2017. He has two grown daughters, three dogs, and three turtles that put him in a peaceful frame of mind. Yaruss is an amateur photographer, an even more amateur backyard astronomer, and he loves to scuba dive.

Roles

Yaruss researches and specializes in fluency disorders such as stuttering and cluttering. His goal is to enhance clinical and didactic opportunities to help student and community clinicians develop their skills for working with individuals with these and other communication disorders. He will collaborate with his MSU colleagues to create a research and treatment center for fluency disorders that combines effective communication, cutting-edge technology, and the latest research-based treatment approaches.

Research and Teaching

Yaruss considers himself a life-long learner, and continually seeks to expand his knowledge and understanding of communication disorders through ongoing research and new partnerships with scientists and educators. His primary goal is to collaborate with his MSU colleagues in building a world-class department for educating speech-language pathologists.

Contact Information

1026 Red Cedar Rd
Oyer Building
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824

Jeff Searl

Jeff Searl

Associate Professor

Department
  • Communicative Sciences & Disorders
searljef@msu.edu
517-353-8780

Bio

Jeff Searl comes to the MSU Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders with a combination of clinical experience and research that can prepare students for the practice of speech and language pathology as well as research in clinical populations.

Searl served for more than a decade as full-time faculty in the Hearing and Speech Department at the University of Kansas Medical Center (KUMC). He also served five years on faculty at Bowling Green State University, and about seven years as a practicing speech-language pathologist at KUMC.

Searl’s faculty roles have focused almost exclusively on graduate student training at the Master’s degree level (training clinicians) and Ph.D. level (training research scientists). As a researcher, his primary areas of interest relate to understanding effort in communication in adults with head and neck cancer or with neurodegenerative diseases.

Searl relocated to mid-Michigan from Kansas City. He has two college-age children as well as two dogs. He enjoys family time, gardening, and cooking most anything—with sushi and Italian cuisine being his favorites.

Roles

Searl engages in a mix of teaching, research and service within his role at MSU. His teaching spans the undergraduate and graduate curricula, and draws on his primary areas of expertise: medical aspects of speech-language pathology. His research is focused principally on alterations to tongue and lip function in adults with head and neck cancer or with neurodegenerative diseases.

Searl enjoys interacting with students from undergraduate to masters to doctoral students. He looks forward to collaborating with colleagues within the department, and across the college and university to build knowledge and improve the diagnosis and treatment of people with communication disorders.

Research and Teaching

Searl’s research focuses on two main areas united by a common theme: effort in communication. His first area of interest is to broaden the understanding of the role of fatigue and effort in behaviors, abilities and communication choices of people with head and neck cancer who have undergone surgery. His ultimate goal is to optimize the clinical practice of medical personnel and speech-language pathologists who care for these patients, and to improve patient quality of life.

Searl’s second area of research focuses on understanding how lip and tongue weakness from neurological diseases (such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) manifests during speech production. His research has led to the development of a system that can index strength of articulation by the tongue and lips as speech is produced. The system allows researchers to inform on the relationships between tongue and lip strength and speech production in neurological disease, examine the relationship between altered speech movements and effort and fatigue, and guide specific instructions that therapists might give such as, ‘exaggerate your articulation,’ ‘be louder,’ and ‘slow down.’

Contact Information

404 Wilson Rd, Room
Communication Arts and Sciences Building
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824

Ida Stockman Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Ida Stockman

Emeritus Faculty

Department
  • Communicative Sciences & Disorders
stockma1@msu.edu

Bio

Dr. Stockman held clinical, teaching and research positions in multiple professional settings before beginning a teaching career at MSU in 1983. She was jointly appointed in MSU’s Departments of Communicative Sciences and Disorders and Counseling, Educational Psychology and Special Education where she taught courses on human development, phonetics, multicultural issues and communication disorders.

Across a career spanning four decades of research, teaching and professional services, Dr Stockman’s work focused on three areas, which include (1) the typical and atypical development of children who acquire minority languages such as African American English, (2) the role of the movement senses (tactile – kinesthetic- proprioceptive) in the cognition and language of children with typical development and those with atypical development on the autism spectrum and (3) the interface of human and machine learning and development. She has made more than 200 scholarly contributions to these areas inclusive of refereed and invited journal articles, conferences and workshops at local, state, national and international venues. She also has rendered services to more than two-dozen professional boards/task forces and reviewed manuscripts for more than a dozen journals.

Since her retirement in 2007, Dr. Stockman has continued to do research, consulting and mentoring. Her current research includes a focus on natural oral language analysis as a least-biased venue for identifying typical developmental milestones among young speakers of minority languages such as African American English and exploring the viability of a minimal competence core notion for creating usable protocols for assessing their language.

Stockman, I.J. Guillory, B., Seibert, M., & Boult, J. (2013). Toward validation of a minimal. competence core for morphosyntax. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 22, 40-56.

Latham, S., & Stockman, I.J. (2014). Effect of augmented sensorimotor input on learning verbal and nonverbal tasks among children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44, 1288-1302.

Newkirk-Turner, B.L., Oetting, J., & Stockman, I.J. (2014). BE, DO, and modal auxiliaries of 3-year-old African American English speakers. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 57 (4), 13-83-93.

Newkirk-Turner, B.L., Horton, R., & Stockman, I.J. (2015). Language acquisition in the African American child: prior to age four. In S. Lanehart (Ed). The Oxford Handbook of African American Language (pp. 439-453). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Stockman, I.J. Newkirk-Turner, B.L., Schwartzlander, E.L., & Morris, L R. (in review). African American children’s performance on the Minimal Competence Core for Morphosyntax and the Index of Productive Syntax.

Stockman, I.J., & Kudsin, J. (in review). Nonsentential utterances in spontaneous speech: An unexplored window on children’s oral communicative competence: Implications for clinical assessment.

Dr. Stockman is a recipient of an MSU Distinguished Faculty Award. She is a Fellow of the American Speech, Language and Hearing Association and a 2006 recipient of Association Honors.

Contact Information

404 Wilson Rd, Room
Communication Arts and Sciences Building
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824

Brad Rakerd Ph.D.

Brad Rakerd

Professor

Department
  • Communicative Sciences & Disorders
rakerd@msu.edu
(517) 432-8195

Bio

Brad Rakerd is a Professor in the Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders. His previous appointments include Chairperson of the Department, Co-Director of MSUs Hearing Research Center, and Director of the Oyer Speech-Language Hearing Clinic. Professor Rakerd is currently an Associate Editor of the American Journal of Audiology. His research interests include sound localization, speech perception, and cognitive effects of hearing impairment. Professor Rakerd is a member of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Acoustical Society of America. His MSU affiliations include the Acoustics Research Group, the Cognitive Sciences Program, and MATRIX: The Center for Humane Arts, Letters,and Social Sciences Online. Research Interests Sound localization, Speech perception, Hearing impairment and cognitive effort

Education

A.B., 1974, Brown University M.A., 1976, University of Pennsylvania Ph. D., 1982, University of Connecticut

MSU Affiliations

Acoustics Research Group Oral History in the Digital Age (OHDA) Project Team Cognitive Science Program

Research and Teaching

Spatial Hearing, Speech Perception. Hearing Impairment and Cognitive Effort, Hearing aid Fitting

Contact Information

404 Wilson Rd, Room
Communication Arts and Sciences Building
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824

Jerry Punch Ph.D.

Jerry Punch

Professor Emeritus

Department
  • Communicative Sciences & Disorders
jpunch@msu.edu
(517) 881-0852

Bio

Dr. Punch, an audiologist, has held clinical, academic, and administrative positions in diverse professional settings. He came to MSU in 1990, where he has taught multiple courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels; conducted research on a variety of topics related to hearing aids, hearing aid fitting procedures, hearing handicap, and hearing loss prevention; and served as department chairperson from 1994-2000. Retired since May 2011, he maintains an office in the department and continues to pursue his professional interests in hearing handicap, hearing loss prevention, and community noise.

After serving seven years as the college representative on MSU’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), he currently serves as an alternate member. Dr. Punch is a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the American Academy of Audiology, and is the recipient of several research and service awards. He consults as a forensic audiologist in cases involving hearing performance standards and community noise, and has a special interest in the association between wind-turbine noise and adverse health effects.

Research and Teaching

Research interests include the development of hearing performance standards for hearing-critical occupations, hearing loss due to exposure to loud noise and music, adverse health effects from exposure to wind-turbine noise, speech audiometric measures, the development and evaluation of low-cost hearing aids, and quality-of-life implications of hearing loss.

Contact Information

1026 Red Cedar Rd
Oyer Speech and Hearing Center
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824

Matthew Phillips M.A., CCC-SLP

Matthew Phillips

Graduate Program Director Professor of Practice

Department
  • Communicative Sciences & Disorders
phill630@msu.edu
(517) 353-3176

Bio

Matt is the director of the Master of Arts Program in Communicative Sciences and Disorders. He received his BA in psychology from the University of Michigan in 1991 and his MA in speech-language pathology from Western Michigan University in 1994. Matt’s clinical work has been both medically- and school-based, and has crossed the lifespan from neonatal/premature infant care to geriatric services. His therapeutic expertise lies in the areas of speech sound disorders, developmental disabilities and low-incidence diagnoses, cultural responsiveness, and behavior. Matt has had the opportunity to support the development of clinicians across the entire breadth of their training, including undergraduate coursework and observation, graduate level study and clinical internships, and clinical fellowships. Previously, Matt held the position of Coordinator of Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports at Ingham Intermediate School District. He is a member of multiple professional organizations and has served as a site visitor for the Council on Academic Accreditation of the American Speech-Language Hearing Association. Matt’s research interests lie in evidence-based clinical supervision, as well as the training and support of clinical supervisors.

Contact Information

404 Wilson Rd, Room
Communication Arts and Sciences Building
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824

Peter LaPine Ph.D.

Peter LaPine

Associate Professor

Department
  • Communicative Sciences & Disorders
lapine@msu.edu
(517) 432-7044

Bio

Dr. LaPine has been a member of the faculty in the Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders at Michigan State University since 1984.

He is an adjunct faculty member in the College of Osteopathic Medicine’s Institute of International Health, Core faculty in the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, and a member of the Vocal Health Team in the College of Music. His career in speech language pathology has provided him with a diverse and rewarding history involving teaching, research, administration, and clinical service. He has been the President of the Mid-Michigan Maxillofacial and Oral Cleft Consultation Clinic, consultant to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs for neurogenic communicative disorders, consultant for videolaryngostroboscopy, digital imagery, and head and neck cancer voice restoration for Head and Neck Surgery Associates, and Mid-Michigan Ear, Nose and Throat in East Lansing, MI.

His publication history includes articles in Folia Phoniatricia, Journal of Medical Speech Language Pathology, Journal of Communication Disorders, Archives of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Music Educators Association, and other national and international journals.

He has developed and directed over 60 clinical training projects in the state of Quintana Roo, Yucatan, Mexico, unique in design as speech-language pathology is the key component of each project. A tele practice model connecting MSU and the Yucatan will be initiated in the spring semester 2018.

Roles

Graduate level  teaching responsibilities have  included  Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology of Speech, Language and Hearing, Motor Speech Disorders, Acquired Language Disorders, Voice Disorders and Medical Aspects of Speech-Language Pathology. Undergraduate teaching responsibilities have included Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech, Language and Hearing Mechanism and Intervention/Rehabilitation Procedures in Speech-Language Pathology.

Research and Teaching

Assessment and intervention of adult and aediatric voice disorders.  Head and neck voice restoration after laryngectomy.  Laryngeal  imaging and acoustic analysis.

Dr. LaPine is dedicated to expanding the international scope of communication disorders.  He has directed the CSD Study Abroad program, has conducted research onsite and provided clinical expertise in the United Kingdom,  and in South and Central America.

Contact Information

101 Oyer Center, 103

Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824

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